Gordon Murray’s T.50 Hypercar is the McLaren F1 2.0

A drawing of the GMD T.50 provided for the press release from Gordon Murray Design
The Gordon Murray Design T.50 is the McLaren F1 2.0! Featuring a 4-Liter V12, a lightweight carbon chassis, and a fan system providing downforce, the T.50 is set to redefine with makes a supercar again. Image © 2019 Gordon Murray Design.

Is this the return of the analog supercar?

Anyone who knows anything about cars knows about the McLaren F1. The brainchild of legendary engineer Gordan Murray, the McLaren F1 completely redefined what made a supercar. In fact, it could even be considered the first hypercar, thanks to its revolutionary engineering and exclusivity. Now, Gordon Murray is at it again; he’s developing the McLaren F1 2.0.

The Gordon Murray Design T.50 marks the 50th car design Murray has done, and this one is a doozy! A carbon-monocoque chassis, three-abreast seating, and a fully manual transmission are featured in the design. Included is a Cosworth V12 engine producing 650 horsepower, and is capable of reaching 12,000 RPM without a flywheel!

An improvement upon the original?

This isn’t even the craziest thing about this car. Apparently, the T.50 is a fan car; downforce is achieved by utilizing a vacuum that creates a low-pressure area under the car, effectively “sucking it” to the ground. There is a slew of famous race cars that utilized this technology, including the Murray-designed Brabham BT46B, and the infamous Chaparral 2J.

Once again, Murray aims to produce the finest supercar ever built. Reportedly, the T.50 would weigh in at under 1000 kilograms and would be slightly smaller than a Porsche 911. Additionally, the car would feature the same principles that guided the design of the F1. Gordon Murray had this to say when describing the T.50:

“I designed the F1 as a sort of super GT car – absolutely road-focused with no plan to go racing, which is why the car set new standards for packaging and luggage space. The T.50 design has the same focus and betters the F1 in every area – ingress and egress; luggage capacity; serviceability; maintenance and suspension set-up. Also, driver-selectable engine maps ensure a driving mode to suit every situation.”

Gordon Murray, GMD T.50 Press Release

Well folks, there it is! The GMD T.50 really is the McLaren F1 2.0! Now if only I could afford it.

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Holy Hell the new Ferrari SF90 Stradale looks GOOD!

The Ferrari SF90 Stradale from the side/rear
The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale. Photo © 2019 Ferrari S.p.A., Retrieved from Evo.co.uk

It’s better looking than the LaFerrari!

Although I shouldn’t get excited for a new hypercar, Ferrari has been teasing one for the last couple of days. Imagine my reaction when I opened my news feed this morning to see this gorgeous thing: The Ferrari SF90 Stradale!

The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale seen from the front
The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale. Photo © 2019 Ferrari S.p.A., Retrieved from Evo.co.uk

Gone are the exaggerated swoopy lines of the LaFerrari. In their place are styling cues from the latest product to come from Pininfarina: The Battista. From the front, the car looks somewhat conservative thanks to the new front air dam treatment and the revised headlights. You can easily see the Battista’s DNA in the car from this angle. The story is the same when you move towards the sides. A revised air intake and sculpted sides complete the resemblance, with the intake moving air under illusionary “flying buttresses.”

The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale seen from the side.
The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale. Photo © 2019 Ferrari S.p.A., Retrieved from Evo.co.uk

Its most interesting angle I think is from the rear. The rear window and transparent engine cover get a sort of “double-decker” treatment. The termination of the flowing lines from the roof and windows and the flying buttresses make the car look compact. The sculpted rear diffuser and exhaust placement dominate the rear end, and the newly squared-off taillights are definitely a cool touch.

The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale seen from the rear.
The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale. Photo © 2019 Ferrari S.p.A., Retrieved from Evo.co.uk

Altogether, the entire car actually reminds me of some of the Fioravanti concept cars that came out in the 2000s. In conclusion, I think the new SF90’s design is a conservative but breathtaking departure. The new car also goes as fast as it looks. It comes with a newly-revised 4-Liter twin-turbo V8 making 770 horsepower and three electric motors making an additional 217 horsepower. Together, the whole system makes 986 horsepower and will propel the 1600 kilogram car to 212 miles per hour.

The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale seen from above
The new Ferrari SF90 Stradale. Photo © 2019 Ferrari S.p.A., Retrieved from Evo.co.uk

The SF90 will come in two models: the “standard” model, and the “Assetto Fiorano” model. The Assetto Fiorano will feature high-tech shock absorbers, carbon fiber door panels, underbody panels, and titanium springs and exhaust. Though I’ll likely never own anything like this, at least I can appreciate the design!

The "Assetto Fiorano" version of the SF90 Stradale seen from above.
A rendering of what the new Ferrari SF90 Stradale “Assetto Fiorano” would look like. Photo © 2019 Ferrari S.p.A., Retrieved from Evo.co.uk

What do you think? Do you like the design of the new SF90 Stradale?

[Opinion] The new McLaren GT looks kind of bland

Has McLaren toned down their design language to appeal to more customers?

By now, you would have seen McLaren’s latest Grand Tourer, the GT. I think it’s a decent looking car, but doesn’t the design seem kind of “generic?” The design is obviously influenced by the gorgeous-but-dumbly-named Speedtail, but I’m not seeing any of the sweeping lines and curves from it.

Instead, there’s the squared off air intake from the Senna, and some design references from the gorgeous 720S, with the fastback rear canopy like the 570GT. The end result to me looks like a hodgepodge of different elements designed to appeal to multiple people. Personally, I dislike this “design-by-committee” approach.

The new GT isn’t as dramatic as the Speedtail or the 720S, and while I think the new styling works to its detriment, it’s pretty clear that this car isn’t designed to go after Porsche or Ferrari. Instead, McLaren is gunning for luxury GT brands like Bentley and Aston Martin. Logic would dictate that styling would have to be more conservative if you’re hoping to capture the luxury GT market.

Still, I’m willing to bet that the car would look much better if they used side panels and intakes from the 720S instead of the Senna.

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Old and New: The Dowsetts Classic Cars Comet

The brand new Dowsetts Comet; British Retro-futurism at it’s finest! Photo ©Autoclassics

Retro done right…

One of the biggest issues I have with car design today is the fact that there is such an emphasis on efficiency and aerodynamics that most new cars are starting to look alike. I’m willing to bet that if you were to take all the popular sedans, de-badge them, and then line them up next to each other, it would be very difficult to tell them apart. In addition to the current design trends, you have the introduction of electric drivetrains, which further serve to drive the emphasis on efficiency. Coupled with the lowering popularity of manual transmissions, cars are starting to become more like appliances than actual objects of desire.

That being said, with the introduction of fully-electric drivetrains, the beginnings of a new trend are started to take hold. Manufacturers like Jaguar are making a bet: now that electric drivetrains are becoming more commonplace, why not revisit the classic designs of yesteryear? Jaguar introduced the E-Type ZERO, a special electric conversion of their famous Series 1 E-Type sports car in order to capture the burgeoning market of classic car design with modern electric technology. And now, a newcomer to this market has made itself known: the Comet.

I count at least 4 different timeless design cues taken for the Dowsetts Comet. Photo ©Carrie Wilson

The brainchild of TV personality and unabashed car enthusiast Ant Anstead, the Dowsetts Classic Cars Comet looks like something that could have easily been a world beating sports car in the 1960’s. With a design that evokes past sports cars from the golden age of car design, like the Aston Martin DB4, the Jaguar E-Types and D-Types, the Alfa Romero TZ2, and even the Maserati Pininfarina A6GCS/53, the Comet is already setting the car design world ablaze with its good looks and modern amenities.

Paired with the all-aluminum (or aluminium for our friends across the pond) 6.2L LS3 small-block V8 from Chevrolet, the Comet can reportedly accelerate from 0-60 miles per hour in under four seconds, and look amazing while doing so. It seems a shame that it’s that fast; I’d rather just cruise on by and feel everyone’s gaze turn toward me! However, the rev-happy small block LS3 isn’t the only choice of drivetrain for this masterpiece of retro-futurism. Dowsetts also offers the choice of a fully electric drivetrain.

The Comet, posed next to the Handley-Page Victor V-Bomber. Photo ©Carrie Wilson

With this car, you can have all the looks of a classic golden age sports car, with the technology of today’s efficient electric drivetrains. Details are still pending on the final mechanical design of the car, however. According to Autoclassics.com, the debut car used a Tremec 5-speed transmission, a limited-slip differential, and a De-Dion-style rear end. This is likely to change with the introduction of the proposed electric drivetrain. Furthermore, the current mechanical setup is also likely to change as the car nears production. You could possibly have your choice of a 5-speed or 6 speed transmission later on, but this has not been confirmed.

The aesthetic mix of classic and modern is carried into the interior a mix of materials and surfaces. Paired with the classic-style wood-rimmed and airbag-less steering wheel, white face gauges, and supple quilted leather, is a mix of polished aluminum surfaces, buttons, and a touchscreen infotainment system. The end result is a fusion of truly retro-futuristic designs inside and out.

The Comet interior. Photo © Autoclassics.com

Is the Comet the latest example of a new trend of retro-futuristic car design? Hopefully the answer is yes; I’m starting to get tired of cars that look like soap bars!

More information on the Dowsetts Classic Cars Comet and Comet Barchetta can be found on Dowsetts Twitter and Instagram. The full website will be coming soon.

It’s a cheese-grater…

The 2020 Silverado HD is a staight-up cheese grater….

The 2020 Chevrolet Silverado Heavy Duty
…a cheese grater

On the bright side, if you hit a deer with that grille you’ll have fresh venison sausage!