I’ve been pretty busy…

Aside from going through thousands of photos from RMMR 2019, going on little adventures here and there, and working on my Miata (more on this later), I’ve been thinking about making a career change.

Don’t get me wrong; I still love photography and I still have plans to expand the Corkscrew’d Store and write on this blog. I’m just kind of at the point in my life where I’m reevaluating some things.

Here are some of the latest happenings on Corkscrew’d!:

  • The Miata Reunion is happening THIS WEEKEND! I’m in the process of prepping the car to show it off. I recently got some new wheels for the car at a great price, but I’m working out the curb rash (that’s why it was a great price lol). The end goal is to have some unique OEM wheels on the Shinsen that makes it just a little more special! I still haven’t worked out that bumper though.
  • I’ve been side-hustling as a freelance product photographer, hence the sparse updates to the blog. I’ve even set up another website just for my photography services! Work is pretty slow though, and the work I did manage to find makes for some pretty interesting stories. And by that, I mean hilariously bad. Maybe I’ll tell those stories later?
  • I haven’t uploaded anything from RMMR 2019 to the store just yet. I’m planning on adding the ability to order prints from the Corkscrew’d Store, but that’s going to require a little bit of cash that I can’t spend at the moment!

And now for the really big news: I’m seriously considering going back to college. I already have a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science and an Associate of Arts degree in Computer Graphics. So, if I were to go back to school in a related field, I would probably go and get a Master’s, right?

Well, what if I wanted to do something different? Computer Science is fun and all, but my heart just isn’t in it anymore. I keep thinking back to when I was just an art student fresh out of High School working on some car designs in my Algebra 2 notes. Heck, I still doodle sports cars in the margins of my notes! Maybe it’s time for me to revive an old dream and see where that takes me? Maybe I should finally get serious about studying industrial design!

The next couple of months are going to get pretty interesting! We’ll see if I decide to go back to school or not, but the sound of pencils scratching on sketchbooks and the smell of the pencil sharpener is calling me!

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It’s finally Friday!

It's finally Friday!
It’s finally Friday! I took My Shinsen Miata “Voodoo” for a high-speed drive to one of my secret locations for a photo!

It’s finally Friday! You know what that means: Time to play hooky from work and go for a drive!

A slow car driven fast

Michael's Miata parked at a scenic overlook on California Route 9
Michael’s Miata parked at a scenic overlook on California Route 9.

“A slow car driven fast is much more fun than a fast car driven fast. You feel much more; the car is more alive.”

Michael J.

Like any other car enthusiast, Michael places his 1990 Mazda MX-5 Miata on a pedestal, and for good reason. The “NA” is the go-to car for any enthusiast born after 1990, simply because it has that rare combination of fun and affordability. You can usually find them on Craigslist for as low $2,000, and its production numbers and abundance of parts means that the NA will be cherished by enthusiasts for a long time.

There is another quality about the NA that makes it memorable: it’s lack of speed, and how it copes with it. Michael said it best; it’s not a fast car. It has a 1.6-liter inline-four, which on a good day makes about a hundred horsepower and some change. But its five-speed transmission with short gearing and low body weight makes the car feel faster than it actually is. Even with bald tires, the car was happily gripping the pavement along the s-curves and hairpins on CA Route 9. This is where we see the NA shine. This car was designed for feeling the curves. A slow car driven fast was indeed fun.

Take the interior for example. There’s nothing in it to distract the driver. Everything is simple and straightforward. Even opening the convertible top isn’t a spectacle like on modern cars. The convertible top is just a means to an end in the quest to make a car focused on the feeling of driving. In this regard, the NA positively eccentric.

Michael is also an eccentric, in that he cares more about how the car feels to drive rather than if it can sync with this phone’s music library. Michael also believes that the simpler and lighter the car is, the better it is overall. Colin Chapman certainly would agree. However, a simple and light car does not necessarily make a car fun to drive. There’s much more to it than that. It has to feel good to drive. Michael’s other car, a Hyundai Veloster Turbo Rally Edition manages to achieve this despite its abundance of “distractions” as Michael liked to put it.

In a way, the NA flies in the face of what car companies today believe a millennial would want to drive. There are no gadgets or mood lighting; no backup cameras or parking sensors. There are barely any cup holders. It’s just you, the car, and the open road. As far as cars go, it’s the equivalent of an old pocket knife versus a really nice German multi-tool.

The thing is, that old pocket knife is all you really need.

Michael sits with his Miata at the Route 9 scenic overlook
Michael sits with his Miata at the Route 9 scenic overlook.

Note: I originally wrote a version of this back in early 2017 before I started Corkscrew’d. The essay was the description for one of the first photo sessions I ever shot. It featured my friend Michael and his 1990 Mariner Blue Mazda Miata, named “Bloo”. We took a trip up Route 9 through Felton, California, and ended our excursion on Skyline Boulevard. I saved the short essay because I wanted to revisit it someday. Now that I’m blogging regularly, I feel that now is a good time to post it again.

I’ve edited the essay a bit for more clarity. Also, Michael no longer owns the Veloster, and now drives a 1991 Toyota Celica instead.

-W